Author Topic: when a 10 is actually 11  (Read 2532 times)

Offline Magnum

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when a 10 is actually 11
« on: November 09, 2009, 02:53:42 AM »
I was reading rules for matches 10m open AG   I can score an 11 :)  if I get a bulls eye inside the line and not touching the outer edge of the bull ring , ..completely inside:)

 Is this the only match where this applies?  http://www.gatewaytoairguns.com/airguns/forums/thread-view.asp?tid=15219&posts=1&start=1

 Years back I recall having to use targets with a black dot in the center of the bull ring and if you touch or take out the dot then you would get extra point making the bull an 11 instead of a 10:) has anyone else seen this ?  maximum score for 15 shot match would be 165 instead of 150:)  BTW I only mention a 1x bull to count for a tie break not as an extra point for the score :)  

Offline gamo2hammerli

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Re: when a 10 is actually 11
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2009, 03:27:51 AM »
I've also read that a "X" is just for tie-breakers.....not an extra regular point.
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Offline ac12basis

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Re: when a 10 is actually 11
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2009, 04:28:35 AM »
For international rules 10m AR and AP competitions, you can score a max of 10.9 in in the finals, and as far as I know ONLY in the finals.  This is based on how perfectly centered the shot is on/in the 10 ring.  All the shots are scored down to 1 decimal place, so you can shoot an 8.7, so in the finals "close counts," as an 8.7 is higher than an 8.0
Some people comment that this was done for spectator interest.  Got to get the spectator interested for the advertisers to pay.

The old NRA scoring, as I remember, the X ring was scored as a 10 and the count of the number of X ring shots were used for tie breaking, example 95-6x beats a 95-4x.

Offline Magnum

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RE: when a 10 is actually 11 interesting read
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2009, 12:58:27 AM »
I must have too much spare time I'm enjoying reading about holes in a target lol!...  I know we all know how to score but Thought someone else may find it an interesting read too?:)  it has a picture of NRA target and the x ring in middle:)  http://www.gbpl.org/pdfs/GBPL_scoring.pdf   I think I may invest in a hole gauge just for the fun of it ..so I will have another gaget:)  
Quote from above site:-
Although most folks reading this are probably well aware of the basic rule, I’ll reiterate it here
(from the NRA Rule Book): “A shot hole, the leaded edge of which comes in contact with the
outside of the bullseye or scoring rings of a target, is given the highest value.” Pretty cryptic, isn’t
it? Basically, if a bullet just touched the outside of a scoring ring (say the 8 / 9 ring), the shot will
count as the higher value (in this case, a 9). They don’t tell you how to score a shot where another
blew away the scoring ring, how to find a double, and other nasty cases that you will run into in the
real world. Note! The hole made in the paper is a good bit smaller than the actual bullet, and
depending on various factors, the ‘leaded edge’ (the grey ring left by the bullet passing through the
paper) may not be quite as big as the actual outside diameter of the bullet either. The leaded edge is
also almost impossible to see if the shot is in the black. That’s why they’ve developed various tools
to determine the close ones.

Offline ac12basis

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Re: when a 10 is actually 11
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2009, 05:53:33 AM »
Magnum
The problem of scoring when another shot hits in the same area, distorting/destroying the 1st shots hole is why for ISSF AP and AR, when paper targets are used it is ONE shot per target.  This is important more for AR than AP because AR target and groups are tighter.  But in a similar manner, on a GOOD day, I have to limit to 5 shots per AP target, or because of the damage to the target from a tight group I cannot score the target.  

For multi shot targets, I have created plastic overlays with the target rings. The overlay recreates the rings, so if you can see where a shot hit, you could recreate where it would have cut the ring.  But this depends on being able to figure out where the shots hit.  If you had a TIGHT group, this may be difficult or impossible.

The hole is why pistol shooters use wadcutter or semi-wadcutters.   They punch a cleaner hole than round nose bullets.

As for the hole gauge.  If I remember right, you can only use it ONCE on  a bullet hole.  The idea is that using it will potentially damage/enlarge the hole such that a 2nd use will have a bigger hole to fit into and result in an inaccurate score.  And it has to be used by someone trained to use it, so the hole is minimally damaged when the device is inserted.